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What causes that strange whirring noise inside your Computer?

artic-pro freezer 7A whirring noise inside your PC almost certainly comes from a loose or damaged fan. But you can never be too sure without opening up your PC’s case.

You may even have a hard drive problem developing. But a dying hard drive is more likely to make a loud clicking noise rather than a whirring one. To play safe make an extra image backup of your hard drive, just in case the hard drive is the culprit.

Once your hard drive is protected, start looking for a problem amongst the fans. You need to figure out which fan is causing the problem and see if it is loose or damaged in some way. How you do this depends on whether you have a laptop or a desktop computer.

Read the rest of this article – http://www.qbs-pchelp.co.uk/pchelparticles/whirringnoise-pcfans.html

Upgrading to Windows 8 will cost £24.99 in the UK

windows 8.1Microsoft is set to charge UK consumers £24.99 to upgrade to the latest version of its Windows Operating System – Windows 8.

The company announced in July that users would be charged $39.99 to upgrade from any version of Windows to Windows 8 Pro.

Yesterday it revealed the UK pricing for a downloaded update will be almost identical, avoiding fears that the firm would ‘rip off’ British consumers, as it has done in the past.

Microsoft is providing a UK English version of Windows 8 Pro, as well as special versions that don’t include Windows Media Player, to comply with the 2004 European Commission ruling.

Microsoft’s download store is registered in Germany, which applies VAT at a rate of 19% – 1% lower than the current UK rate.

The move comes just days after Microsoft revealed it has updated its corporate logo for the first time in 25 years as it prepares for the Windows 8 launch.

Faster Booting with Win 8

windows8lockscreen140105Microsoft will require that new PCs bearing the Windows 8 logo use a new boot solution called Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), which will significantly improve the boot process and experience. It replaces the archaic Basic Input Output System (BIOS) that we’ve used for decades.

You’ll see much faster boot times, on the order of 8 seconds from pressing the power button to being in Windows. This, along with less need for restarts, can help increase productivity in the office and save IT personnel time when applying upgrades or installing software.

Safeguards built into UEFI can also help save the IT department time and resources over the long term. Secure Boot prevents unauthorised operating systems from loading, and Early Launch Anti-Malware (ELAM) protects against boot loader attacks. UEFI will also allow remote diagnostics and repair of computers within the pre-OS environment. So instead of physically sending a technician to visit a PC experiencing boot issues, it might be possible to repair and restore the machine over the network.

Though most will enjoy the benefits of UEFI, there has been some controversy over the Secure Boot feature of UEFI that Microsoft is requiring PC makers to turn on by default. It’s not totally clear yet, but Secure Boot may have to be manually disabled for those who want to install or dual boot another OS such as Linux, adding an extra step to the process.

The Final Countdown for Windows XP

windowslogo_270x225If you are still using Windows XP be aware that Microsoft support for this Operating System will end on the 8th April 2014. So now is the time to make sure your Windows XP installation is fully up to date.

By now you should have Service Pack 3 installed. To check if you have, right click on My Computer and select Properties. Under the System heading make sure it says Service Pack 3. If it lists Service Pack 2 or even Service Pack 1 its time to update your copy of Windows XP to Service Pack 3.

Read more about installing Service Pack 3 – http://www.qbs-pchelp.co.uk/pchelparticles/windowsxp-thefinalcountdown.html.